[PW] Children's SF book or short story

Ivan Van Laningham ivanlan9 at gmail.com
Wed Nov 18 08:00:12 PST 2015


"Interview by computer" brings to mind Asimov's classic story, "Franchise,"
in which a single person is chosen to be the "voter of the year."

However, nothing else in the OP's description matches.

Metta,
Ivan

On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 7:48 AM, d-lien University of Minnesota <
d-lien at umn.edu> wrote:

> I'm out there (or in here, anyway), but I'm afraid I don't know the
> story.  I second all of John Cowan's points on what is is not,
> however.
>
> I can also eliminate a few more "hot world juvenile sf novels" -- it's
> not FIVE AGAINST VENUS or BATTLE ON MERCURY or Heinlein's "Tenderfoot
> in Space" (which takes place on a junglish Venus).  It's also not
> ALPHA CENTAURI OR DIE or ALPHA YES, TERRA NO (nor is it RECRUIT FOR
> ANDROMEDA, a title which I thought might be misremembered as an
> "alpha" word, and the "recruit" part sounded promising).
>
> I don't think it's any of the Winston SF Juvenile series, which are
> probably the best remembered and most widely read juvenile sf novels
> of the 1950s/1960s period and still popular into the 1970s and beyond.
> I'm almost positive it's not anything by Andre Norton, probably the
> most popular writer of young adult sf of the period.  That still
> leaves a lot of possible novels (that I haven't read) and even more
> short stories.
>
> I posted the query on one of my other lists and will report back if
> anyone recognizes it.  Sorry,
>
> Dennis Lien / U of Minnesota Libraries (retired) /  d-lien at umn.edu
>
> On Wed, Nov 18, 2015 at 7:33 AM, John Cowan <cowan at mercury.ccil.org>
> wrote:
> > Holly Campbell-Polivka scripsit:
> >
> >> I did a google search and was able to find somebody else on a science
> >> fiction forum searching for what I believe may be the same book. The
> >> clue I got from that was that the person thinks the planet or world
> >> may be called something like Alpha.
> >
> > Since Alpha Centauri is the closest star to the Sun, it's been used in
> > lots of sf novels, so that doesn't help much.
> >
> >> I'm wondering if the author possibly could be
> >> Robert Silverberg, and if the story may be Revolt on Alpha C,
> >
> > I'd say the description in Wikipedia rules that out: Alpha C is populated
> > by dinosaurs and human colonists.
> >
> >> And suggestions I got from another listserv include: Dorsai novellas
> >> by Gordon R. Dickson;
> >
> > I can rule that out.  The plot doesn't remotely match any of the Dorsai
> > novels, and in the Dorsai universe, there is no planet called Alpha;
> > the worlds orbiting Alpha Centauri are named Newton and Cassida.
> >
> >> The Immortals of Mercury, by Clark Ashton Smith;
> >
> > Smith's work is classic fantasy, and would be unlikely to feature a
> > computer.  The story you mention is online at
> > <
> http://www.eldritchdark.com/writings/short-stories/98/the-immortals-of-mercury
> >
> > and doesn't fit your plot at all.  Wash out Smith altogether.
> >
> >> or Planet of Adventure stories, by Jack Vance.
> >
> > No plot match, based on Wikipedia.  This plot doesn't sound anything
> > like Vance to me.
> >
> > Sorry not to be more helpful, but negative evidence is still evidence.
> >
> > --
> > John Cowan          http://www.ccil.org/~cowan        cowan at ccil.org
> > A rose by any other name may smell as sweet, but if you called it
> > an onion you'd get cooks very confused.          --RMS
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-- 
Ivan Van Laningham
God N Locomotive Works
http://www.pauahtun.org/
http://www.python.org/workshops/1998-11/proceedings/papers/laningham/laningham.html
Army Signal Corps:  Cu Chi, Class of '70
Author:  Teach Yourself Python in 24 Hours


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