[PW] question for any British wombats

Luke Owens lilongjr at gmail.com
Mon Apr 20 11:12:46 PDT 2015


Yes, I'm aware of that, Sylvia. My comment wasn't about what is, but about
what can be understood.

Luke

On Mon, Apr 20, 2015 at 11:05 AM, Sylvia Milne <sylviamilne at btinternet.com>
wrote:

> They probably would, but in British universities you get a 1st, 2one
> (upper 2nd), 2two (lower second) or a third.
>
> From Sylvia Milne
>
>
> > On 20 Apr 2015, at 18:50, Luke Owens <lilongjr at gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > I should also point out that the late Sir Terry Pratchett, in his novel
> THE
> > LIGHT FANTASTIC, had the character Rincewind state that "...if it's Summa
> > Cum Laude the living is easy". Admittedly, he was going for the pun, but
> I
> > should think that he used that pun knowing that his British readers would
> > recognize both the original Latin phrase AND the Gershwin lyrics.
> >
> > Luke
> >
> >> On Mon, Apr 20, 2015 at 10:47 AM, Kevin O'Kelly <rkokelly at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> Thank you all.
> >>
> >>> On Mon, Apr 20, 2015 at 12:10 PM, <cowan at ccil.org> wrote:
> >>>
> >>> Kevin O'Kelly scripsit:
> >>>
> >>>> She uses phrases like "graduate summa cum laude" instead of "get a
> >> first"
> >>>
> >>> Sounds like classic over-translation to me.  One translation of
> >>> Solzhenytsin's _One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch" translates
> >>> a Russian phrase meaning "from the first clang of the rail to the
> >>> last clang of the rail" as "from reveille to taps".  When I showed
> >>> this to a russophile friend, he asked if the translator renamed the
> >>> hero "Private Dennison".  There's also the idea (due to Douglas
> >> Hofstadter)
> >>> of "translating" a history of France written in French into German
> >>> by making it a history of Germany!  (Presumably it would start with
> >>> Charlemagne / Karl der Grosse and diverge from there.)
> >>>
> >>> If any change was required, "get a first-class degree" might be
> >>> clearer for Americans.
> >>>
> >>>> and also has used the phrase "baby boomers" at least once.
> >>>
> >>> Doing a Google search showed the phrase appearing in the _Mirror_, the
> >>> _Telegraph_, and the _Daily Mail_.  (I disregarded the _Guardian_
> because
> >>> it has American writers and even American subs / copy editors.)  I
> think
> >>> that's fair evidence that the phrase is not unknown there.
> >>>
> >>> (Disclaimer: I'm a Yank.)
> >>>
> >>> --
> >>>
> >>>
> >>> _______________________________________________
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> >>> list at project-wombat.org
> >>> http://www.project-wombat.org/
> >>>
> >>
> >>
> >>
> >> --
> >> _______________________________________________
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> >> list at project-wombat.org
> >> http://www.project-wombat.org/
> >>
> > _______________________________________________
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> > list at project-wombat.org
> > http://www.project-wombat.org/
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