[PW] Laver's Law was Question on Acceptability Timeline for Fashions in Clothing

stephen pomes stephen_pomes at yahoo.com
Fri Mar 26 14:39:50 PST 2021


 One of my colleagues at the library informed me that this timeline/time scale concept has the eponymous name of Laver's Law, as it is nameded after the art critic, art historian, and museum curator James Laver.   James Laver
As I work at a science/technology library, I was pleased that this science-oriented librarian knew this one.  So much for pre-judging people!

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James Laver

James Laver, CBE, FRSA (14 March 1899 – 3 June 1975) was an English author, critic, art historian, and museum cu...
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Steve

    On Thursday, March 25, 2021, 05:04:58 PM CDT, stephen pomes <stephen_pomes at yahoo.com> wrote:  
 
 I understand that a late 19th century - early 20th century clothing designer and/or fashion writer -- whose name escapes me -- came up with a scale or timeline for acceptability for fashions in clothing.  The idea is that fashions in clothing have to be assimiliated into the general population to be acceptable.  In other words, he was trying to describe how clothing designs.  He wasn't trying to describe how people influence the process, so I don't think he discussed "tastemakers" and others in this discussion of a timeline or a scale.
Clothing designs start off as being too "out there" and are not socially acceptable.  As time passes, clothing designs become less shocking.  Eventually, a particular design is in widespread use and is considered fashionable.  Still later, the design is considered "frumpy" or "dowdy" -- in other words "out-of-date."  Still later, the clothing design is considered "classic."  As I recall, this designer came up this scale or timeline, and he used years and decades to mark how the general public perceives these designs and evaluates them.  I'm hoping that someone will be familiar with this designer and/or fashion writer and can provide the name of the person and/or the concept that I'm attempting to describe.
I've used Google and Wikipedia.  Unfortunately, I can't recall any other details, so my efforts have been for naught.  
Thanks,
Steve Pomes
   


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