[PW] John Dryden's grammar

John Cowan cowan at ccil.org
Mon Jul 30 08:16:58 PDT 2018


It's a verb meaning "are accustomed, so /jus/ is the pronunciation.  We
only use (heh) this meaning in the past tense nowadays, and we no longer
feel "I used to go" as meaning "I was accustomed to go", though
historically that was its meaning.

On Mon, Jul 30, 2018 at 10:56 AM, Thomas Fuller <tdruryfuller at gmail.com>
wrote:

> I am scheduled to sing “You Twice Ten Hundred Deities”, found in Act III,
> scene 2 of *The Indian Queen* (first performed in 1664, printed in 1665):
> music by Henry Purcell, text by by John Dryden.  The piece contains the
> following verse:
>
>
>
> “From thy sleepy mansion rise,
>
> And open thy unwilling eyes,
>
> While bubbling springs their music keep,
>
> That use to lull thee in thy sleep.”
>
>
>
> The question for the learned W0mbats is:  How is this passage grammatically
> parsed?  More specifically, is “use” a noun or a verb? This determines
> whether it is pronounced “yooze” or “yoose”.  (As far as I can determine,
> it is *not* a misprint for “used”.) If a noun, what “use” is intended?
> (What
> is “that use”?)  If a verb, what is its subject? (“That” is a cop-out
> answer.  Who or what is “that”?)  The general drift of the passage is
> understandable (I guess), but any suggestions or conjectures on the exact
> language, and the right way to pronounce “use”, will be appreciated.
>
>
>
> You can find the full text at
>
>
>
> https://www.bartleby.com/332/216.html
>
>
>
>    -
>
>    if that helps.
>
>
>
> Tom, not used to questions like this
> _______________________________________________
> Project Wombat - Project-wombat
> list at project-wombat.org
> http://www.project-wombat.org/


More information about the Project-Wombat-Open mailing list