[PW] Term for "place of origin" as part of a personal name?

Ivan Van Laningham ivanlan9 at gmail.com
Mon Nov 20 09:39:12 PST 2017


Hi All--
While googling for a partial place name lookup page (no luck at all) this
morning, I ran across this page on Wikipedia:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Demonym

Does that fit the bill?

Metta,
Ivan

On Fri, Nov 17, 2017 at 7:40 AM, John Cowan <cowan at ccil.org> wrote:

> On Thu, Nov 16, 2017 at 11:40 AM, Bruce MacDonald <bmacdona at gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
> Human Diversity: Its Nature, Extent, Causes and Effects on People, page 101
> >
> By Bernard Charles Lamb
> > https://books.google.com/books?id=CcTACwAAQBAJ&pg=PA101
> > (This looked really interesting. Careful, you might get sucked right into
> > this chapter. It also defines the use of a profession such as Miller as a
> > "metonym".
> >
>
> This terminology is very unusual.  Normally, "toponym" just means "place
> name",
> like "Boston", and "metonym" means "the use of a part for the whole or vice
> versa", like "the Crown" instead of "the Queen".
>
> Normally I see these called locational/habitational surnames and
> occupational surnames.  The other two main sources of surnames are
> inherited nicknames and frozen patronymics: "Cowan" is a shortened form of
> "Mac Eoghain", the son of Eoghan, though my father was named not Owen but
> Thomas.
>
> --
> John Cowan          http://vrici.lojban.org/~cowan        cowan at ccil.org
> BALIN FUNDINUL          UZBAD KHAZADDUMU
> BALIN SON OF FUNDIN     LORD OF KHAZAD-DUM
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>



-- 
Ivan Van Laningham
God N Locomotive Works
http://www.pauahtun.org/
http://www.python.org/workshops/1998-11/proceedings/papers/laningham/laningham.html
Army Signal Corps:  Cu Chi, Class of '70
Author:  Teach Yourself Python in 24 Hours


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