[PW] Pratchett Song

JT Whitfield jwhitfield at aclib.us
Thu Jun 11 10:50:57 PDT 2015


Hi Luke.
Here is a possible answer from Google Answers.

"Subject: Re: Reference to old song 
 Answered By: unicow-ga on 06 Dec 2002 13:02 PST 
   

Thanks for using Google answers. The song that you are referring to is
based on the german folk song "Ach De Lieber Augustine" and is
attributed to Saint Augustine. According to the web site of Frank
Petersohn,
 "This song originated in Vienna during the Plague period of
1768-1769. Legend has it that one evening, Augustin hoisted one too
many and decided on a nap half way home. The morning corpse patrol
threw his body on the cart with the other corpes and took him away.
Fortunately Augustin awoke in the nick of time, to the horror of the
mortician. In no time at all, the rumor spread far and wide that wine
was not only cure but also a great prophylactic for the plague."

The melody is so basic that many lyrics use it as the base
melody.There several version of the song that include the phrase you
quote. The most complete one I could find is:

All The Little Angels

All the little angels rise up, rise up,
All the little angels rise up high.

How do they rise up, rise up, rise up?
How do they rise up, rise up high?

They rise /heads/ up, /heads/ up, /heads/ up,
They rise /heads/ up, heads up high.

All the little angels rise up, rise up,
All the little angels rise up high.

How do they rise up, rise up, rise up?
How do they rise up, rise up high?

They rise /knees/ up, /knees/ up, /knees/ up,
They rise /knees/ up, knees up high.

All the little angels rise up, rise up,
All the little angels rise up high.

How do they rise up, rise up, rise up?
How do they rise up, rise up high?

They rise /ARSE/ up, /arse/ up, /arse/ up,
They rise /arse/ up, arseup high.

See how they rise up, rise up, rise up,
See how they rise up, rise up high. 

All the little angels ascend up to Heaven
All the little angels ascend up on high
Which end up?
Ascend up
Which end up?
Ascend up
All the little angels ascend up on high

I think if you listened to the melody and song you would recognize it
in many tunes you hear.

I do not think there is any significance to the phrase in the book. I
have searched numerous groups and discussions of the song and no one
seems to have commented on it. However, during the war many songs were
adapted to the melody because it was so simple. The British were
particularly adept at this. The original lyrics seem to have a very
melancholy tone of despair at the shape of the world and its morals.
It could be applied to the novel.

Web Sites

For the lyrics and melodie of the original.
http://ingeb.org/Lieder/achdulie.html
or http://ingeb.org/

For lyrics and discussions about Terry Prachett.
alt.books.prachett (Google Groups)."

Link: http://answers.google.com/answers/threadview?id=103194

Hope this helps.
JT

-----Original Message-----
From: Project-Wombat-FM [mailto:project-wombat-fm-bounces at lists.project-wombat.org] On Behalf Of Luke Owens
Sent: Wednesday, June 10, 2015 3:24 PM
To: list-open at project-wombat.org
Subject: [PW] Pratchett Song

I'm re-listening to the late Sir Terry Pratchett's novel NIGHT WATCH and got to wondering about the song that threads its way through Sam Vines'
mind. The song has the repetitious quality and metre that indicates it would be a good marching song for soldiers.

It starts by asking how "they rise up" and each verse tells which part of their body rises up first. I am  now wondering if this is based on a real marching song and, if so, what that song is.

This is just for me, so no hurry Thanks in advance!

Luke
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