[PW] question for any British wombats

Timothy Cotsford tcotsford at acpe.edu.au
Mon Apr 20 17:33:28 PDT 2015


I'm English (though living in Australia), and I'd concur that common usage in the UK is first, two one etc, rather than Summa Cum Laude (which would be seen as a US term).
Baby boomers is reasonably widespread in the UK, and would not be uncommon (it's also used regularly in Australia)

Cheers

Tim

Timothy Cotsford
Information Services Librarian
Australian College of Physical Education

Phone +61 2 9739 3367

tcotsford at acpe.edu.au
http://www.acpe.edu.au

1 Figtree Drive
Sydney Olympic Park NSW 2127

.

-----Original Message-----
From: Project-Wombat-Open [mailto:project-wombat-open-bounces at lists.project-wombat.org] On Behalf Of Sylvia Milne
Sent: Tuesday, April 21, 2015 4:05 AM
To: list at project-wombat.org
Subject: Re: [PW] question for any British wombats

They probably would, but in British universities you get a 1st, 2one (upper 2nd), 2two (lower second) or a third. 

>From Sylvia Milne


> On 20 Apr 2015, at 18:50, Luke Owens <lilongjr at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
> I should also point out that the late Sir Terry Pratchett, in his 
> novel THE LIGHT FANTASTIC, had the character Rincewind state that 
> "...if it's Summa Cum Laude the living is easy". Admittedly, he was 
> going for the pun, but I should think that he used that pun knowing 
> that his British readers would recognize both the original Latin phrase AND the Gershwin lyrics.
> 
> Luke
> 
>> On Mon, Apr 20, 2015 at 10:47 AM, Kevin O'Kelly <rkokelly at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>> Thank you all.
>> 
>>> On Mon, Apr 20, 2015 at 12:10 PM, <cowan at ccil.org> wrote:
>>> 
>>> Kevin O'Kelly scripsit:
>>> 
>>>> She uses phrases like "graduate summa cum laude" instead of "get a
>> first"
>>> 
>>> Sounds like classic over-translation to me.  One translation of 
>>> Solzhenytsin's _One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovitch" translates 
>>> a Russian phrase meaning "from the first clang of the rail to the 
>>> last clang of the rail" as "from reveille to taps".  When I showed 
>>> this to a russophile friend, he asked if the translator renamed the 
>>> hero "Private Dennison".  There's also the idea (due to Douglas
>> Hofstadter)
>>> of "translating" a history of France written in French into German 
>>> by making it a history of Germany!  (Presumably it would start with 
>>> Charlemagne / Karl der Grosse and diverge from there.)
>>> 
>>> If any change was required, "get a first-class degree" might be 
>>> clearer for Americans.
>>> 
>>>> and also has used the phrase "baby boomers" at least once.
>>> 
>>> Doing a Google search showed the phrase appearing in the _Mirror_, 
>>> the _Telegraph_, and the _Daily Mail_.  (I disregarded the 
>>> _Guardian_ because it has American writers and even American subs / 
>>> copy editors.)  I think that's fair evidence that the phrase is not unknown there.
>>> 
>>> (Disclaimer: I'm a Yank.)
>>> 
>>> --
>>> 
>>> 
>>> _______________________________________________
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>>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --
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